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Thoughts On And For A Structured Existence

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Poems

“Walking The Walk With Dante” On The Camino De Santiago In Spain

raymond-meeks-on-the-camino-de-santiago-nyt-magazine On the last page inside the back cover of the New York Times Magazine, in Part 6 of “The Voyages Issue“, photographer Raymond Meeks walked the 500-mile road in Northwest Spain that for 1200 years been one of the great spiritual quests.

Dante, in Canto XXV of the The Paradiso, stated:

“…in the narrow sense, none is called a pilgrim
save him who is journeying towards the sanctuary
of St. James, or is returning.”

The monks of Cluny built monasteries along the trail with the new “pilgrim funds” that flowed after the discovery of the tomb of St. James, apostle to Jesus Christ, was discovered in 814.

“The Poem of the Cid”, written in the mid 12th Century, was a true story of a Castilian hero El Cid during the Reconquista of Spain from the Moors.

It was a sight to see the lances
rise and fall that day;
The shivered shields and riven mail,
to see how thick they lay;
The pennons that went in snow-white
come out a gory red;
The horses running riderless,
the riders lying dead;
While Moors call on Mohammed,
and ‘St. James!’ the Christians cry,
And sixty score of Moors and more
in narrow compass lie.”

walking-the-walk-with-dante-on-the-camino-de-santiago

“Poetry Must Be Difficult”: Artificial Intelligence And The Coming Renaissance In Literary Culture

     In awarding the 1948 Nobel Prize in Literature to T.S. Eliot, the Swedish Academy cited the “horror vacui (Latin for “fear of empty space”) of modern man in a secularized world, without order, meaning, or beauty” that Eliot wrote about and confronted. This demise of Literary Culture, bemoaned for over 100 years, commenced with World War I and its aftermath.

Popular Culture has evolved from war and debasement of authority in the 20th Century. The Information Age provides on-demand entertainment and, as Eliot and many others would describe, pseudo-culture to billions of people. A supermarket of easy to understand programming.

But Cultural Literacy is challenging and comprehensive:

T. S. Eliot, review of Metaphysical Lyrics and Poems of the Seventeenth Century Donne to Butler Times Literary Supplement, October 1921 and Selected Essays 1929

Artificial Intelligence (AI) could usher in a new Renaissance, a “reinvented version of Humanism“. AI algorithms will access great works of classical antiquity and Western Literary Canon, and, aided by 190,000 word vocabularies (Shakespeare’s plays use 33,000), will write original, comprehensive and allusive literature. Curated AI is now publishing poetry and prose written only by machines.

The School of Athens Fresco by Italian Renaissance Artist Raphael 1511

Eliot wrote thatpoetry is not a turning loose of emotion, but an escape from emotion”. Machine learning, unemotional, evolving with experience, offers a “predictive” quality. Will history and Literary Culture predictably repeat themselves with Plato and Aristotle at the center?

Wasted Time: “I Had Not Thought Social Media Had Undone So Many”

“Augmented Times,
Under the bright skies of a summer day,
A crowd streamed through Heisler Park, so many,
I had not thought social media had undone so many.
Comments, brief and isolated, were blurted,
And each person locked their eyes upon a smartphone.”

(Adapted from “The Waste Land” by T.S. Eliot)

The enduring fascination and importance, for me, of T.S. Eliot’s modernist, compressed epic poem “The Waste Land” (1922) is that it is at first obscure and intimidating, but opens up and rewards readers with the power of poetic “allusion“. Eliot seeks “to express an age through expression of self“.

How have billions of people come to express themselves in our “New Media Age”?

By uploading and posting photos, selfies and videos from their smartphones to social media sites. Pictures (“worth a thousand words”) are the ultimate form of compression, with Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Pinterest allowing members to create epic moments.

The people in Laguna Beach reminds one of Eliot’s crowd that “flowed over London Bridge”. The beauty of the ocean, rocky coastline and beaches obscured as they stared at the small screens of their iPhones. Turning a picturesque reality into a virtual one. Self-expression to a thousand friends.

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